SMSOE Seminar Series

The Arctic is melting. Is it time to panic?

That’s what a panel of international researchers, including UNH's Larry Mayer and Nancy Kinner, will discuss Tuesday, April 9, at UNH in Durham. The seminar which is free and open to the public, will address how scientists and the public can confront the challenges and opportunities of Arctic change.

Public perception and news media coverage have recently caught up with what scientists have known for decades: The Arctic is warming much faster than the rest of the planet. In this panel, Arctic researchers from the U.S., Sweden and Japan will share their firsthand experiences with Arctic change. How have each of these researchers experienced Arctic change in their own fields? Which implications of melting sea ice, glacier calving or thawing permafrost are they most concerned about? What challenges and opportunities do these unprecedented changes present to communities living and working in the Arctic?

Event Information

The panel will be held from 4-6 p.m. Tuesday, April 9, in Huddleston Hall, 73 Main St., Durham, N.H.

Parking available at the Campus Crossing Visitors Lot for a nominal fee.

Register Here

MODERATOR:
Nancy Kinner, The University of New Hampshire

PANELISTS:
Larry Mayer
, The University of New Hampshire
Nina Kirchner, Stockholm University
Miyase Christensen, Stockholm University
Niklas Eklund, Umea University
Hideaki Murayama, The University of Tokyo

The panelists are all members of the Arctic Science IntegrAtion Quest (ASIAQ), a project that unites six universities (UNH, Sweden's Stockhom University, Umea University and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, University of Tokyo and NARFU in Russia) in a joint endeavor to advance research and education for a sustainable Arctic. This seminar closes a two-day ASIAQ workshop hosted at UNH.

“Ultimately, we need to understand both the local and global impacts of Arctic change, including how it is affecting our own communities, whether in New Hampshire, Stockholm or Tokyo,” says Jessica Ernakovich, assistant professor of natural resources and the environment at UNH and an ASIAQ member. “This panel will engage the audience to consider how we can all help ensure sustainable development of the New Arctic.”

Summary

While scientists have known the Arctic is warming much faster than the rest of the planet for decades, only over the past year has Arctic change been plastered across the front pages of major US newspapers.  Arctic ice melt is being described by the New York Times, Washington Post, and Rolling Stone as “Unprecedented,” “Shocking,” “A Real Time Horror Story,” “A Tipping Point”, “The Big Melt,” “A New North.” Why has the topic of Arctic warming suddenly gained such prominence in the US? Is the same thing happening in Sweden and Japan? What about on an international scale?

This panel discussion will bring together researchers from the United States, Sweden, and Japan to share first-hand experiences with Arctic change. How have each of these researchers experienced Arctic change in their own fields? Which implications of melting sea ice, glacier calving, thawing permafrost, etc. are they most concerned about? What challenges and opportunities do these unprecedented changes present to communities living and working in the Arctic?

Ultimately, we need to understand both the local and global impacts of Arctic change, including how it is affecting our own communities, whether in New Hampshire, Stockholm, or Tokyo. This panel will engage the audience in discussions to identify what all of us can do to help ensure sustainable development of the New Arctic.

Sponsored by the Arctic Science IntegrAtion Quest (ASIAQ) and Stockholm University.

Co-sponsored by the UNH School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering.

More about SMSOE Seminars

The School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering invites you to our monthly seminar series! This series is designed to bring the UNH and local marine communities together to learn, discuss, network and hopefully to develop new ideas and ways to collaborate with partners both on and off campus. Each seminar will include several short talks relating to the seminar's theme, followed by an opportunity for questions and a social. Light refreshments and a cash bar will be available. The seminars are launched with the following goals in mind:

  • Promote awareness and identity for the SMSOE Community both within and outside of UNH.
  • Build connections both on- and off-campus among UNH researchers, students, educators, stakeholders and others around important topics related to marine and coastal resources.
  • Facilitate discussions that will help focus research and other efforts to effectively address challenges and opportunities facing management of marine and coastal resources.

The event is designed to include one hour of presentations and Q&A followed by a one-hour social.