No Where to Hide

UNH Researchers find invasive seaweed makes fish change their behavior.
Cunner in the Isles of Shoals Photo Credit: Jennifer Dijkstra/UNH
Tuesday, May 22, 2018

When it comes to finding protection and a safe feeding ground, fish rely on towering blades of seaweed, like kelp, to create a three-dimensional hiding space. Kelp forests have been shown to be one of the most productive systems in the ocean with high biodiversity and ecological function. However, in recent decades, many kelp habitats have been taken over and replaced by lower turf-dominated seaweed species. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that this change in the seascape may impact the behavior of fish and could be leaving them less options for refuge and more vulnerable to predators.

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