UNH Arctic

Arctic landscape

UNH Arctic

The Arctic is on the front lines of climate change, with surface temperatures rising twice as fast as the global average, dramatic loss of mass in sea ice, the Greenland ice sheet and other glaciers, and rapidly thawing permafrost. Not only is a warming and thawing Arctic driving far-reaching impacts in Arctic ecosystems and social systems, changes in the Arctic have profound implications for the environment and social systems across the globe.

UNH Arctic aims to build a more vibrant and interdisciplinary network of Arctic researchers at UNH, increase UNH’s visibility within the national and international Arctic dialogue, and assist in the transition to more sustainable communities.

Researchers sampling in the Arctic

Research


UNH participates in field studies across the Arctic through diverse projects.

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UNH Student in the Arctic

Education


Excellence in interdisciplinary education and Arctic field training for future Arctic researchers and leaders.

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Poster Presentation at Research Conference

News and Events


UNH Arctic sponsors and participates in many Arctic focused event both locally and internationally.

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Recent Stories

Two Pacific white-sided dolphins leap out of the ocean water.

Differentiating Dolphin Dialects

Differentiating Dolphin Dialects

Improved acoustic technology tracks habitat shift to colder waters...

Article
The Stordalen mire in Abisko, Sweden, a subarctic region where Assistant Professor Jessica Ernakovich has collected data on soil microbes in permafrost.

Microbial Ecologist Honored with CAREER Award

Microbial Ecologist Honored with CAREER Award

Funds to support research, teaching and outreach targeting soil microbes in thawing permafrost...

Article
A photo showing Arctic researchers Jess Steketee, a Ph.D. candidate, and Dr. Rebecca Rowe from the UNH Department of Natural Resources and the Environment

Arctic Changes; Global Impacts

Arctic Changes; Global Impacts

Stressing the importance of Arctic ecosystems through mentorship...

Article

UNH Land Acknowledgement

As we all journey on the trail of life, we wish to acknowledge the spiritual and physical connection the Pennacook, Abenaki, and Wabanaki Peoples have maintained to N’dakinna (homeland) and the aki (land), nebi (water), olakwika (flora), and awaasak (fauna) which the University of New Hampshire community is honored to steward today. We also acknowledge the hardships they continue to endure after the loss of unceded homelands and champion the university’s responsibility to foster relationships and opportunities that strengthen the well-being of the Indigenous People who carry forward the traditions of their ancestors.